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GenerationsForward

The Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center created a second and third generation group, called GenerationsForward.

This group includes children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors. We meet throughout the year and have ongoing projects and events.  Members of this group are invited to take the Safekeeping Stories workshop which is designed to create effective Holocaust speakers. 

If you would like to be part of this group or have questions, please contact Millie Jasper at  mjasper@hhrecny.org

GenerationsForward is generously underwritten by the Richard Lowenstein Memorial Fund.

We look forward to you joining us.

Education

GenerationsForward have ongoing projects to help educate individuals

Speakers

Members speak out, as seen through the lens of family members experiences and survival

Continuing a Legacy

A group bringing together second and third generation individuals of Holocaust survivors

GenerationsForward Speakers

Michelle Gewanter

Granddaughter of four Holocaust Survivors

Shares the story of her paternal grandmother, who hid from the Nazis in Poland

Graduated from Cornell University and New York University Law School

Works for New York State Assemblywoman Amy R. Paulin

Michelle Gewanter

As the granddaughter of four Holocaust survivors, Michelle Gewanter tells their story to honor and preserve their memories.  She is committed to transmitting the stories and lessons of the Holocaust to audiences of all ages.

Michelle shares her paternal grandmother’s story of survival in World War II Poland, where her grandmother, Hindzia, hid from the Nazis and their collaborators. Hindzia was the only member of her immediate family to survive, with the exception of her brother who had fled to Russia in the early part of the war.  After the war, Hindzia met her husband, Karl, who had survived by hiding in an underground bunker that he built with his brothers in a Polish forest. They lived in a displaced persons camp in Austria, where Michelle’s father was born, until they emigrated to the United States in 1950.

Residing in Scarsdale with her husband and three children, Michelle works for New York State Assemblywoman Amy R. Paulin, focusing on legislative policy and constituent affairs.  She graduated from Cornell University and New York University Law School. After law school, Michelle’s commitment to helping Holocaust survivors led her to a position as assistant settlement counsel on the Holocaust Victim Assets Litigation (also known as the Holocaust-Swiss Bank cases).  In addition, she worked for the American Jewish Committee and the NYU Law School Masters of Law program.

Michelle is a member of GenerationsForward, a group of second and third generation individuals sponsored by the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center of White Plains, New York.

Carol-Gladstone

Aunt and uncle, Bertha and Henry Behr, imprisoned in Terezinstadt

Retired educator from New York City School System & Mercy College School of Education

Cyberseniors volunteer at Greenburgh Public Library

Dr. Carol Gladstone

Dr. Carol Gladstone’s aunt and uncle, Bertha and Henry Behr, were imprisoned in Terezinstadt from 1941-1945 until Carol’s father brought them to America in 1946. The Behrs’ experience with starvation and extreme cruelty at the hands of the Nazis form the basis of her narrative and its relationship to child abuse spanning three generations.

Henry Behr was among the Holocaust artists whose work depicts the camp and living conditions. Carol Gladstone’s Aunt Bertha and Uncle Henry exemplify how survivors of Terezin as well as victims of abuse could ultimately lead productive, loving lives.

Carol is a retired educator from the New York City School System and the Mercy College School of Education, so her background enables her to address classes about overcoming dark times in history and in one’s personal life. She lives with her husband in Hartsdale, NY and is on the executive board of the Lower Hudson Valley Council of Supervisors and Administrators Retiree Unit.

Dr. Carol Gladstone is a volunteer with the cyberseniors at the Greenburgh Public Library and serves on the Retired Faculty Association of Mercy College.

Dr. Gladstone is a member of GenerationsForward, a group of second and third generation individuals sponsored by the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center of White Plains, New York.

Ellen Bachner Greenberg5

Daughter of two Holocaust Survivors

Mother was hidden in a convent

Tells the story of her father's journey from Germany to Poland and through 3 concentration camps

A Life Coach

 

 

Ellen Bachner Greenberg

Ellen Bachner Greenberg is the daughter of two holocaust survivors.

Ellen’s mother, Ruth Bachner, was born in Austria and fled to Belgium in 1943 where she spent the remainder of the war hidden in a convent.  Her father, Fred Bachner, was born in Berlin and his life changed dramatically in 1940 when he and his family were exiled to (Chrzanow) Poland as part of the increased restriction the Germans imposed on the Jews.  Everyone was forced to work and Fred, who was 15 years old, found a job delivering beer and soda to German Army posts, restaurants, and even Trzebina, a labor camp.   In 1943 the Germans marched in to Chrzanow to remove all Jews and Fred was sent to a concentration camp.

Ellen’s presentation chronicles her father’s life before the war and his experience surviving 3 concentration camps and death marches.  Through taped video interviews he gave before he passed away in 2008, we hear Fred’s own testimony of what daily life in concentration camp was like.

Ellen speaks of her father’s incredible will to survive and the optimism, perseverance, and positive attitude that exemplified how he lived his life post war. Ellen discusses what it was like for her growing up as the child of holocaust survivors and speaks honestly and openly about the impact it has had on her.

Ellen and her husband Carl are the proud parents of 2 children who live and work in Manhattan.  Ellen enjoys working as a Life Coach and guiding her clients towards achieving goals, overcoming obstacles, and making changes in their lives.

Anita-Greenwald

Daughter of two Holocaust survivors

Has started successful organizations that continue to thrive

Anita Greenwald

Anita Greenwald is the daughter of two Holocaust survivors. Her father was only 12 years old when the Nazis arrived in his Polish town of Tomasev Lubelski and sent him to Siberia, resulting in heart-breaking loss and a lifelong commitment to family, Israel and making a good life. Her mother was only 5 years old when she was taken from her German home to Camp Gurs, France, and was just the beginning of her journey of devastation and miracles. Anita will tell her father’s/mother’s story and share how being a child of a Holocaust survivors has impacted her life.

Anita lives in Armonk, NY with her husband, Richard and they have two childen that are launched and two in college. Professionally, Anita has started successful organizations that continue to thrive, in both the corporate and the non-profit world.

Anita is a member of GenerationsForward, a group of second and third generation individuals sponsored by the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center of White Plains, New York.

ellen kaidanow 2

 

Daughter-in-law of two Holocaust survivors

 

Tells the story of her mother-in-law, who became the sole surviving family member at age 6

 

Converted to Judaism

 

Previously worked in real estate and executive recruiting

 

 

 

 

 

Ellen Kaidanow

Ellen Kaidanow is the daughter-in-law of two Holocaust survivors.  Her mother in law, also named Ellen Kaidanow, was only 5 years old when her mother, father and two sisters were all forced to move from their beautiful home in Dubno, Ukraine to a walled Jewish ghetto.  Ellen tells the story of her mother in law’s life as a young girl in the ghetto and her miraculous tale of becoming the sole survivor of her family at age 6.  She was saved by a Christian woman who hid her for two years.

Ellen was adopted into a very religious Catholic family in California when she was six weeks old.  Her aunt is a nun and she grew up attending Catholic schools.  As fate would have it, she fell in love with a nice Jewish guy from New York who was working in San Francisco.  They married in 1988 and after being exposed to Judaism during 21 years of marriage and raising three Jewish children, she began studying Judaism and Christianity intently for six years.  She converted to Judaism in March of 2015 and then had her Bat Mitzvah several months later.  Despite growing up in very different worlds, the stories of the two “Ellens” share some parallels, losses, happiness and fulfillment.

Ellen feels that part of her fate and purpose is to be a witness for her mother in law’s story.  She wants to honor her and help others of all religions have a personal connection to the Holocaust so they become witnesses. Most important, she wants to influence others to be “upstanders”, not bystanders. She also wants to show those who are struggling with tragedy that her mother in law was able to be resilient under the worst circumstances and went on to have great joy and love in her life despite the devastating experiences she had as a child. She wants to inspire others to never give up hope and to be grateful for what you do have. When possible, Ellen’s mother in law will accompany her to the presentation and will be available for a question and answer period afterward.

Ellen lives in Harrison, NY with her husband, Joseph. They have two daughters who are out of college and working, and a son who is still in college.  Ellen worked in commercial real estate and executive recruiting before she became a full-time mother, active community organizer and volunteer for her children’s schools. She continues her volunteer work with her synagogue, UJA, and several other local non-profit organizations.  She enjoys playing tennis and canasta and being a member of GenerationsForward, a group of second and third generation individuals sponsored by the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center of White Plains, New York.

Sandra-Mehl

Lost several family members in the Holocaust

Tells the story of the Horner and Kellner families

Graduated from Columbia University

A Licensed Master of Social Work & practitioner of energy medicine

Taught Hebrew & Global Studies

Sandra Mehl

Sandra Mehl is a first generation American who lost several family members in the Holocaust. She tells the story of the heroic deeds of the Horner and Kellner families, who lived in Poland, Germany and Belgium, and rescued lives and precious legacy from Nazi occupied Europe. Additionally, she shares the impact of her experiences growing up with survivors and offers a message of hope for the next generations – how to shift from surviving to thriving.

Although Sandra’s story evolved from a commitment to keeping her family’s values and traditions alive and a desire to gift a unique legacy to her grandson, Zevi on the occasion of his becoming a Bar Mitzvah, she is also determined to help the next generations connect to a fateful time in history that dares to repeat itself, and accept the call to action to make certain “never again”.

Sandra graduated from Columbia University and is a Licensed Master of Social Work and practitioner of energy medicine. After living in Harrison, Westchester where she raised her children, practiced in neighborhood hospitals, taught Hebrew and Global Studies in community schools, she recently moved to Stamford, Ct. where she happily lives near her family, and is excited to start the next chapter.

Sandra credits her family for teaching her to survive, and her journey as a member of Generations Forward, a group of second and third generation individuals sponsored by The Holocaust & Human Rights Education Center of White Plains, for helping her learn to thrive.

Sandra is a member of GenerationsForward, a group of second and third generation individuals sponsored by the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center of White Plains, New York.

Audrey-Unger-Reich-and-father

Pictured: Audrey Unger Reich with her father Ron Unger

Father is a Holocaust survivor

An artist & educator, telling her father’s Holocaust story

 

 

Audrey Unger Reich

Audrey’s father, Ron (Romek) Unger, grew up in the southern Polish town of Tarnow. His life changed abruptly at age 11, when the Nazis invaded Poland in September 1939. He lived under ever-increasing restrictions and brutality until he was deported to Plaszow, the first of three concentration camps he was sent to during the War. He was liberated from Ebensee (a satellite camp to Mauthausen) on May 6, 1945, only months after his father died of infection and malnutrition. Ron’s mother was murdered at Auschwitz. Ron spent more than three years in a displaced persons camp in Italy until emigrating to the United States in December 1948.

Audrey visited Poland in 2014 and was able to find her father’s home in Tarnow, as well as the building where his family’s business had been. She also visited Zbylitowska Gora, a forest outside of Tarnow, where, in June 1942, 6,000 Tarnow Jews, including 800 children, were shot by German soldiers and then buried in mass graves.

Audrey is an artist and educator, who tells her father’s Holocaust story, and has created artwork inspired by it. Ron is involved in the “Adopt-a-Survivor” program on Long Island. They hope to ensure that the horrors of the Holocaust, and the personal stories of the survivors, will never be forgotten.

Audrey is a member of GenerationsForward, a group of second and third generation individuals sponsored by the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center of White Plains, New York.

sandler v3

Wendy is the daughter of a Holocaust survivor

Her mother is a Founding Board member of the HHREC

She shares the story of her mother who hid her identity under a false name and false documents  from the Nazis in Poland.

 

Wendy Sandler

Wendy shares the story of her mother's journey from a Jewish six year old to a Catholic school girl who hid in the convent back again to an ardent Jew. She credits her blue eyes with saving her because she didn’t look Jewish and could pass as an Aryan.

Wendy’s mother's story is also about luck and the Upstanding actions of a Priest who risked his life to do help secure proper documentation for the family. It’s a story about hope...and doing the right thing in the face of grave danger.

Wendy is active in UJA Federation and other charitable organizations in the Westchester community, She lives with her husband Neil in Mamaroneck. They have two sons who have graduated from college and are working in New York City.

She's also a Gallery Educator who leads tours for school age children at the Museum of Jewish Heritage, A Living Memorial to the Holocaust in New York City.

Wendy is a member of GenerationsForward, a group of second and third generation individuals sponsored by the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center of White Plains, New York.

Joan Salamon

Mother was a Holocaust survivor

Grandmother and Aunt were victims

Researcher and Holocaust scholar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joan Long Salomon

Joan Long Salomon is the daughter of a Holocaust survivor and the niece and granddaughter of Holocaust victims. She will speak about what it was like to be a Jewish person living in Nazi Germany, as seen through the lens of her family's experiences, as well as how being a child of a survivor has impacted her life. Her talk is punctuated by poignant excerpts from letters written by her grandmother in Nazi Germany to her mother in America.

 

Joan travels frequently to Germany where she engages in Holocaust research, speaking and memorialization work and the laying of Stolpersteine ("stumbling blocks") for victims from the city her family lived in.

Joan is a member of GenerationsForward, a group of second and third generation individuals sponsored by the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center of White Plains, New York. She has a Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Joan speaking at Stolpersteine laying in Mainz.

Joan speaking at Stolpersteine laying in Mainz. Minister of Cultural Affairs Marianne Grosse looks on.

Old Mainz

Joan, with the "Old City" district of Mainz in the background. This location is very important to her work.

Joan and the Burgermeister of Essenheim, Germany.

Joan and the Buergermeister of Essenheim holding Stolpersteine.

Kathy-Grosz-Zaltas

Kathy's parents are Holocaust survivors

Was a foreign language teacher

She & her family are owners of Zaltas Gallery of Fine Jewelry

 

 

 

Kathy Grosz-Zaltas

Kathy Grosz-Zaltas is a daughter of Holocaust survivors. She tells their story to honor their lives and to have their story serve as a purposeful tool to look at bullying, injustice, antisemitism and bigotry in our world today.

Her parents grew up in different parts of Czechoslovakia, enjoying happy, cultured and well-to-do lives. And then, suddenly, the Nazi era began to control their lives, destroying their families forever.

Concentration Camps, Forced Labor, Death Marches were their lot…Despite their hardships and loss, survival was their personal miracle.

Kathy speaks about their lives after the War, along with their growing family in America. She discusses what it is like to be part of the Second Generation.

Kathy lives with her husband in Rye New York. Her family and grandchildren live close by, which is the joy of her life. She was a foreign language teacher for 17 years in Westchester County. Currently, she and her family are the owners of Zaltas Gallery of Fine Jewelry, where she curates fine jewelry and diamonds as well as creates custom pieces for her clients.

Kathy is a member of GenerationsForward, a group of second and third generation individuals sponsored by the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center of White Plains, New York.

Debby Ziering

Debby's parents are Holocaust survivors

Tells the story of her father's war time experiences

Has a Master's in speech-language pathology

Debby Ziering

Debby is the daughter of two Holocaust survivors. Her father Herman, was born in Kassel Germany and was sent to the Riga Ghetto in Latvia. Herman was a teen when the Nazis invaded Germany. He survived the Riga Ghetto and Kaiserwald, a work camp in Riga Ghetto.

Debby recounts her father's’  story from the perspective of  a young teen as well as how her father's wartime story has impacted her.

Debby lives with her husband and three sons in Scarsdale. She received her masters in speech-language pathology.

Debby is a member of GenerationsForward, a group of second and third generation individuals sponsored by the Holocaust and Human Rights Education Center of White Plains, New York

To book a speaker contact Millie Jasper
mjasper@hhrecny.org
914.696.0738